ELon Musk wrote on Twitter, “Ads are too frequent on Twitter and too big. Taking steps to address both in coming weeks.”

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Economic Times – ET Edge Insights, its management, or its members

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ELon Musk wrote on Twitter, “Ads are too frequent on Twitter and too big. Taking steps to address both in coming weeks.”

In a bid to enhance the user experience on Twitter, CEO Elon Musk recently announced plans to roll out higher-priced subscription plans with no advertisements, according to recent reports. The American billionaire remarked that Twitter users are inundated with ads too frequently and measures will be taken to redress the issue in coming weeks. Musk tweeted, “Ads are too frequent on Twitter and too big. Taking steps to address both in coming weeks”, on Saturday. After assuming ownership of Twitter last year, Musk has made numerous changes to the company, one of them being floating subscription plans for the verified blue badge.

The South African-born entrepreneur announced in December last year that the basic blue tick subscription will have half the advertisements and the subsequent higher-tier plan with no ads will be released in 2023. The plan was introduced last year in the wake of a mass exodus of advertisers from the social media platform due to many blue tick accounts impersonating celebrities and popular brands, according to a report. Previously, the blue check mark was reserved for verified accounts of journalists, famous personalities, and other public figures.

The San Francisco-based social media giant recently released a subscription plan named Twitter Blue at a discount. Users can now avail of the annual plan for 84 dollars. Twitter Blue is now available in Britain, Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. Earlier this month, Twitter revoked its 2019 ban on political ads.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Economic Times – ET Edge Insights, its management, or its members